Cervical Cancer

Cervical Cancer is the most deadly type of cancer for women and one of the most common among women.

Generally, cervical cancer does not show symptoms at an early stage. New symptoms appear when cancer has begun to spread. In many cases of cervical cancer associated with sexually transmitted infections.

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus that is connected to the vagina. One function of the cervix is to produce mucus or mucus. Mucus helps channel sperm from the vagina to the uterus during sexual intercourse. In addition, the cervix will also close during pregnancy to keep the fetus in the uterus, and will widen or open during labor.

Types of Cervical Cancer

Detection of the type of cervical cancer suffered by the patient will help the doctor in providing appropriate treatment. This type of cervical cancer is divided into two, namely:

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SSC). SSC is the most common type of cervical cancer. SSC starts in squamous cells, which are cells that line the outside of the cervix.
  • Adenocarcinoma. This type of cervical cancer starts in glandular cells in the cervical canal.

In rare cases, both types of cervical cancer above can occur simultaneously.

Cervical Cancer Stadium

Stage or stage is used to explain the rate of spread of cancer. The higher the stage of cancer, the wider the spread. Following is the stage of cervical cancer based on its spread:

          Stage 1

  • Cancer cells grow on the surface of the cervix, but have not spread beyond the uterus.
  • There is a possibility that the cancer has spread to the surrounding lymph nodes, but has not attacked the surrounding organs.
  • Cancer size varies, can even be more than 4 cm.

    Stage 2

  • Cancer has spread to the uterus, but has not spread to the lower part of the vagina or pelvic wall.
  • There is a possibility that the cancer has spread to the surrounding lymph nodes, but has not attacked the surrounding organs.
  • Cancer size varies, can even be more than 4 cm.

    Stage 3

  • The cancer has spread to the lower part of the vagina, and pressing the urinary tract and causing hydronephrosis.
  • There is a possibility that the cancer has spread to the surrounding lymph nodes, but has not attacked the surrounding organs.

    Stage 4

  • Cancer has spread to other organs, such as the bladder, liver, lungs, intestines, or bones.

Research reveals that life expectancy in patients with cervical cancer depends on the stage experienced. However, life expectancy is only a percentage of patients who are still alive, five years after being diagnosed with cervical cancer.

For example, a life expectancy of 80% means that 80 out of 100 patients survive 5 years after being diagnosed with cervical cancer. Keep in mind, many patients who live more than 5 years after being diagnosed with cervical cancer.

The following are life expectancy in patients with cervical cancer based on the stage experienced:

  • Stage 1 – 80-93%
  • Stadium 2 – 58-63%
  • Stadium 3 – 32-35%
  • Stage 4 – 15-16%
Thanks To dr. Tjin Willy

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